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Ambient Air Pollution and Infant Health: Home Monitors Make Cardiorespiratory Connections

Betts, Kellyn S

Environmental Health Perspectives, 2011, Vol.119(9), p.a398-a398 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Ambient Air Pollution and Infant Health: Home Monitors Make Cardiorespiratory Connections
  • Author: Betts, Kellyn S
  • Subjects: News | Science Selections ; Air Pollution ; Cardiovascular Health ; Children'S Health ; Ozone ; Particulate Matter (Pm) ; Respiratory Health ; Surveillance And Monitoring
  • Is Part Of: Environmental Health Perspectives, 2011, Vol.119(9), p.a398-a398
  • Description: Children are particularly susceptible to the health effects of air pollution because they spend more time outdoors, have higher respiratory rates, and breathe in a greater volume of air relative to their body weights. Babies may be especially sensitive to the effects of air pollution because their immune, respiratory, and central nervous systems are not fully developed. To date, infants’ respiratory responses to air pollution have been studied much less extensively than those of older children. A new study now links ambient air pollution to an increased risk for apnea (prolonged pauses in breathing) and bradycardia (decreases in heart rate) in babies at high risk for these conditions [EHP 119(9):1321–1327; Peel et al.].
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0091-6765 ; E-ISSN: 1552-9924 ; DOI: 10.1289/ehp.119-a398a ; PMCID: 3230420 ; PMID: 21885381

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