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Maternal High‐Fat Diet Effects on Adaptations to Metabolic Challenges in Male and Female Juvenile Nonhuman Primates

True, Cadence ; Dean, Tyler ; Takahashi, Diana ; Sullivan, Elinor ; Kievit, Paul

Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 2018-09-17, Vol.26 (9), p.1430-1438 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Maternal High‐Fat Diet Effects on Adaptations to Metabolic Challenges in Male and Female Juvenile Nonhuman Primates
  • Author: True, Cadence ; Dean, Tyler ; Takahashi, Diana ; Sullivan, Elinor ; Kievit, Paul
  • Subjects: Pregnancy ; Animals ; Obesity - complications ; Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects ; Female ; Male ; Obesity - physiopathology ; Macaca ; Metabolism - physiology ; Mothers ; Studies ; Nutrition research ; Obesity ; Weight control ; Diet ; Metabolism ; Monkeys & apes ; Endocrinology ; Food ; Adaptation ; Index Medicus ; metabolism ; obesity ; high-fat diet
  • Is Part Of: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 2018-09-17, Vol.26 (9), p.1430-1438
  • Description: Objective This study aimed to determine whether maternal high‐fat diet (HFD) consumption in nonhuman primates alters the ability of offspring to adapt metabolically to nutrient and caloric challenges. Methods Offspring from Japanese macaque dams fed either a control (CTR) diet or HFD were weaned onto a CTR diet creating two groups: maternal HFD (mHFD, n = 18) and maternal CTR (mCTR) diet (n = 12). Male and female offspring were exposed to a 5‐day 30% calorie restriction and to a 35‐day HFD challenge (HFDC), at 16 and 24 months of age, respectively. Caloric intake, body weight, and energy expenditure were measured. Results Offspring from both groups showed similar body weight, food intake, and metabolic adaptations to a 5‐day calorie restriction. mHFD offspring demonstrated increased food intake and early weight gain in response to a 35‐day HFDC; however, group differences in weight dissipated during the challenge. Unlike mCTR animals, the mHFD group had a significant increase in fasting insulin after acute HFD exposure. Conclusions The current findings indicate that offspring exposed to an mHFD show metabolic adaptations to calorie restriction that are largely similar to those of offspring exposed to a mCTR diet but show delayed adaptation upon exposure to an acute HFDC.
  • Publisher: United States: Wiley
  • Language: English
  • Identifier: ISSN: 1930-739X
    ISSN: 1930-7381
    EISSN: 1930-739X
    DOI: 10.1002/oby.22249
    PMID: 30226008
  • Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved

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