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De Darkness at noon (1941) d’Arthur Koestler à L’Aveu (1968) de Lise et Artur London et à L’Évasion silencieuse (1990) de Lena Constante

Vuillemin, Alain

Philologica Jassyensia, 2013, Vol.IX(1 (17)), pp.209-220 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    De Darkness at noon (1941) d’Arthur Koestler à L’Aveu (1968) de Lise et Artur London et à L’Évasion silencieuse (1990) de Lena Constante
  • Author: Vuillemin, Alain
  • Subjects: Politics / Political Sciences ; Political Trials ; European Literature ; Novel ; Autobiography ; Prison Memoirs ; USSR ; France ; Romania ; Czechoslovakia ; Languages & Literatures
  • Is Part Of: Philologica Jassyensia, 2013, Vol.IX(1 (17)), pp.209-220
  • Description: The term “Stalinist trial” means rigged trials, taking place in Russia in order to eliminate political opponents to Stalinism. The first denunciations go back to 1929. At that time, returning from a visit to the USSR, Panaït Istrati published a damning testimony on these practices in his book To the Other Flame and The Confession of a Loser, published in French, in Paris, in October 1929. This book was written with other two authors, Victor Serge, a journalist of Russian descent, and Boris Souvarine, another journalist of Ukrainian origin. Starting with February 25, 1927, a concept, that of “enemy of the workers” was introduced in the Soviet law in order to allow legal prosecution of all the alleged opponents of the Revolution. Between 1936 and 1938, the great Moscow trials were the most spectacular manifestation. Several million people became its victims. A novel, Darkness at Noon, written in German by a Hungarian author, Arthur Koestler, then translated into English and published...
  • Language: French
  • Identifier: ISSN: 1841-5377 ; E-ISSN: 2247-8353
  • Source: Central and Eastern European Online Library (C.E.E.O.L.)

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