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Humour appreciation and comprehension in children with intellectual disability.

Degabriele, James ; Walsh, Irene P Degabriele, James (correspondence author) ; Degabriele, James (record owner)

Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR, June 2010, Vol.54(6), pp.525-537 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Humour appreciation and comprehension in children with intellectual disability.
  • Author: Degabriele, James ; Walsh, Irene P
  • Degabriele, James (correspondence author) ; Degabriele, James (record owner)
  • Subjects: Cartoons As Topic–Psychology ; Child–Psychology ; Comprehension–Psychology ; Female–Psychology ; Humans–Psychology ; Intellectual Disability–Psychology ; Intelligence–Psychology ; Language Development Disorders–Psychology ; Male–Psychology ; Video Recording–Psychology ; Wit and Humor As Topic–Psychology
  • Is Part Of: Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR, June 2010, Vol.54(6), pp.525-537
  • Description: BACKGROUNDData on typically developing children show that humour development starts from an early age. Studies investigating humour in children with intellectual disability (ID) are few and have generally focused on identifying differences between this population and other groups of children. This study focuses on children with ID as a heterogeneous group and seeks to answer the following questions: (1) what kinds of humour do children with ID appreciate most in a video cartoon? (2) How does the mode of presentation of jokes influence humour comprehension? METHODThis study examines humour appreciation and comprehension in school-aged children (n = 9; chronological age: 7-11 years) with mild/moderate ID. Specific tools were developed to explore each aspect. Participants rated short scenes from a video cartoon to show their appreciation for different kinds of humour. A set of video-recorded jokes, with different modes of presentation, were used in the comprehension task. RESULTSThe greatest appreciation was expressed for physical and visual humour. Non-specific scenes (i.e. scenes with no particularly funny elements) were also rated highly. Jokes presented with gesture were understood more than jokes told without supports. These differences in comprehension, arising from supported/unsupported jokes, were statistically significant within the group studied. CONCLUSIONSThe context of humour (e.g. being part of a video cartoon) is important in determining what children with ID find funny. The significant difference in comprehension brought about by a change in mode of presentation (i.e. supported/unsupported joke telling) suggests that humour comprehension can be facilitated.
  • Language: English
  • Identifier: E-ISSN: 1365-2788 ; DOI: 1365-2788 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2788.2010.01277.x

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