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Motor evoked potential depression following repetitive central motor initiation

Kluger, Benzi ; Palmer, Candace ; Shattuck, Johanna ; Triggs, William

Experimental Brain Research, 2012, Vol.216(4), pp.585-590 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Motor evoked potential depression following repetitive central motor initiation
  • Author: Kluger, Benzi ; Palmer, Candace ; Shattuck, Johanna ; Triggs, William
  • Subjects: Transcranial magnetic stimulation ; Fatigue ; Central motor control ; Motor imagery
  • Is Part Of: Experimental Brain Research, 2012, Vol.216(4), pp.585-590
  • Description: Prior reports have described a transient and focal decline in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-induced motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude following fatiguing motor tasks. However, the neurophysiological causes of this change in MEP amplitude are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether post-task depression of MEPs is associated with repetitive central motor initiation. We hypothesized that MEP depression is related to repeated central initiation of motor commands in task-related cortex independent of motor fatigue. Twenty healthy adults had MEPs measured from the dominant first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle before and after six different tasks: rest (no activity), contralateral fatiguing hand-grip, ipsilateral fatiguing hand-grip, contralateral finger tapping, ipsilateral finger tapping, and imagined hand-grip (motor imagery). Changes in MEPs from baseline were assessed for each task immediately following the task and at 2-min intervals until MEPs returned to a stable baseline. Measures of subjective effort and FDI maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) were also recorded following each task. A statistically significant drop in MEP amplitude was noted only with contralateral finger tapping and imagined grip. Changes in MEP amplitude did not correlate with subjective fatigue or effort. There was no significant change in FDI MVCs following hand-grip or finger-tapping tasks. This study extends our knowledge of the observed decline in MEP amplitude following certain tasks. Our results suggest that central initiation of motor programs may induce a change in MEP amplitude, even in the absence of objective fatigue.
  • Language: English
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0014-4819 ; E-ISSN: 1432-1106 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00221-011-2962-y

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