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The changes of oligodendrocytes induced by anesthesia during brain development

Danye Jiang Sanghee Lim Minhye Kwak Yun Kyoung Ryu C. David Mintz

Neural regeneration research, 2015, Vol.10 (9), p.1386-1387 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    The changes of oligodendrocytes induced by anesthesia during brain development
  • Author: Danye Jiang Sanghee Lim Minhye Kwak Yun Kyoung Ryu C. David Mintz
  • Subjects: 麻醉药物 ; 少突胶质细胞 ; 合作伙伴关系 ; 神经毒性 ; 发育过程 ; 全身麻醉 ; 大脑发育
  • Is Part Of: Neural regeneration research, 2015, Vol.10 (9), p.1386-1387
  • Description: With the advent of modern techniques, drugs, and monitoring, general anesthesia has come to be considered an unlikely cause of harm, particularly for healthy patients. While this is largely true, newly emerging clinical and laboratory studies have sug- gested that exposure to anesthetic agents during early childhood may have long-lasting adverse effects on cognitive function. This concern has been the focus of intense study in the field of anesthesia research. A recent high-profile review by Rappaport et al. (2015) concluded that while many questions remain un- answered, there is strong evidence from laboratory studies that commonly used anesthetics interfere with brain development and that clinical studies suggest a correlation between early childhood exposure to these agents and subsequent effects on learning and cognition. The issue is of sufficient public health importance that a public-private partnership known as Smar- Tots (Strategies for Mitigating Anesthesia-Related Neurotoxicity in Tots) was developed by the FDA to study pediatric anesthetic neurotoxicity. The mechanism of injury underlying this phe- nomenon has yet to be fully elucidated, and there is evidence to suggest that anesthetics may have direct cytotoxic effects on neurons leading to cell death or suppressed neurogenesis (Strat- mann et al., 2010) and that they may interfere with key pro- cesses in neuronal growth and development that underlie brain circuit development (Wagner et al., 2014).
  • Language: English
  • Identifier: ISSN: 1673-5374

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