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Giant coronary aneurysms producing chest pain

Pfister, Raymond ; Sadeghi, Yalda ; Orrit, Javier ; Prêtre, René

Journal of cardiothoracic surgery, 2019-03-08, Vol.14 (1), p.52-52 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Giant coronary aneurysms producing chest pain
  • Author: Pfister, Raymond ; Sadeghi, Yalda ; Orrit, Javier ; Prêtre, René
  • Subjects: Transluminal angioplasty ; Aneurysms ; Coronary artery bypass ; Chest pain ; Atherosclerosis ; Index Medicus ; Giant coronary aneurysm ; Coronary bypass ; Coronary ectasia ; Case Report
  • Is Part Of: Journal of cardiothoracic surgery, 2019-03-08, Vol.14 (1), p.52-52
  • Description: Coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) are defined as localized coronary artery dilations more than 1.5 times the diameter of the adjacent segments [1]. Giant coronary aneurysms (GCAA) are unusual and aneurysms on the left side are even rarer. Mechanisms are unclear, but seem predominated by atherosclerosis. Until now, management of giant coronary aneurysm is still unclear. A 62-year-old man, presented a 4-month history of progressive chest pain aggravated by physical CAAs: 3 on the right coronary artery (RCA), including a giant one, and one on the intermediate branch. Intraoperatively, we found two proximal RCA CAAs of 2 cm each, a 6 cm distal RCA CAA partially thrombosed, and a 3 cm CAA on the intermediate branch. The two largest CAAs were resected and two saphenous graft bypasses were performed. Treatment options include medical treatment (antiaggregation, anticoagulation), percutaneous coronary angioplasty and surgery. Results of observational or conservative management in the few cases of GCAA described in literature, appear to have poor results. Surgery is a good option with low operative risk, especially in giant coronary aneurysms.
  • Publisher: England: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
  • Language: English
  • Identifier: ISSN: 1749-8090
    EISSN: 1749-8090
    DOI: 10.1186/s13019-019-0872-4
    PMID: 30850000
  • Source: © ProQuest LLC All rights reserved

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