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Chronobiology Impacts Response to Antihypertensive Drug Regimen in Type 2 Diabetes

Friedman, E. A. ; Banerji, M. A.

Diabetes Care, 06/01/2011, Vol.34(6), pp.1438-1439 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Chronobiology Impacts Response to Antihypertensive Drug Regimen in Type 2 Diabetes
  • Author: Friedman, E. A. ; Banerji, M. A.
  • Subjects: Medicine
  • Is Part Of: Diabetes Care, 06/01/2011, Vol.34(6), pp.1438-1439
  • Description: Chronobiology is the term applied to the study of how body rhythms are governed by our environment, starting with the solar system, which cycles night and day and changes one season into another (1). Bodily responses encompassed by chronobiology determine both everyday behavior and expression of illness (2). Key rhythms modulating health and disease states may be circadian (lasting about 24 h and defining sleep-awake patterns) or infradian (lasting longer than 24 h, as in monthly menstruation). Adjusting timing of medical treatment to its differing effects depending on the patient's circadian state as currently applied in nocturnal asthma (3) and arthritis (4) is called chronotherapy. Hermida et al. (5) report a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded end point trial of how varying the time of day during which antihypertensive drugs are taken may affect cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes. That chronotherapy might assist in management of hypertension was appreciated by Bartter et al. (6) in a retrospective 24-h study of a single patient with systolic and diastolic hypertension treated with hydrochlorthiazide in 1976. Availability of continuous 24-h blood pressure monitoring devices prompted a French study in 1985 suggesting that each hypertensive patient be evaluated over a full day with subsequent antihypertensive drug treatment scheduled to fit daily periods of highest pressure (7). Noting …
  • Language: English
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0149-5992 ; E-ISSN: 1935-5548 ; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc11-0576

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