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Abstract 102: School Teachers Can Effectively Instruct Children in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Using Personal Manikin and Instructional Video: Randomized Trial

Kikuchi, Migaku ; Satoh, Masaaki ; Seo, Norimasa ; Inoue, Teruo ; Sakamoto, Tetsuya ; Marukawa, Seishiro ; Nonogi, Hiroshi

Circulation, 2010, Vol.122(21_MeetingAbstracts Suppl 1) [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Abstract 102: School Teachers Can Effectively Instruct Children in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Using Personal Manikin and Instructional Video: Randomized Trial
  • Author: Kikuchi, Migaku ; Satoh, Masaaki ; Seo, Norimasa ; Inoue, Teruo ; Sakamoto, Tetsuya ; Marukawa, Seishiro ; Nonogi, Hiroshi
  • Is Part Of: Circulation, 2010, Vol.122(21_MeetingAbstracts Suppl 1)
  • Description: Background: Widespread training is required to increase the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by lay persons. Mass training of CPR for school children is the key issue for the spread. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of studentsʼCPR training guided by their teachers using instructional materials without instructor training.Methods: The fifth grade 164 elementary school children were randomized to receive 45 minutes CPR training using personal manikins and the enclosed instructional DVD (CPR anytime from Laerdal) by their teachers without instructor training (92 students; group 1) or that by American Heart Association (AHA) basic life support instructor (72 students: group 2). After 45-minutes training, quality of CPR in every student was evaluated by other AHA instructors using skill performance check sheets.Results: Both groups correctly performed the checking response, the activating emergency response system and calling for AED, the 30 chest compressionsʼ rate and the sequences after AED arrival. In both group 1 and group 2, however, the accuracy of opening airway (36% vs 31%, NS), checking for adequate breathing (49% vs 43%, NS), and giving 2 mouth-to-mouth breaths (32% vs 21%, NS) was very low. For the chest compression, placing hands on appropriate position was observed in 48% in group 1 and 51% in group 2 (NS). The adequate depth of chest compressions was observed in 26% in group 1 and 32% in group 2 (NS). There were no differences in all skill performances between both groups.Conclusions: School teachers can effectively instruct children in the core CPR skills using personal manikin and instructional DVD, comparable with well-trained instructors. First 45-minutes training for the elementary school children might be too short to achieve the high quality CPR. Repeated training by school teachers would enable students to acquire the highly qualified chest compression and breathing management.
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0009-7322
  • Source: Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. All rights reserved.

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